Sunday, July 10, 2011

Defining Fine Art Photography

Fine art photography, by definition, are the photos that express an artist's creative vision. This is quite the opposite of photojournalism and commercial photography business. You've got a very clear objective with those commercial images: to sell a product or service. Then, photojournalism is necessary for any sort of magazine that utilizes documentaries. None of these really define what fine art photography is.
There are some genres that define this type of photography, and they include natural landscapes, portraits and nudes. Nowadays, there are far more exhibitions of this kind of photography arranged and organized than before. It is becoming quite a trend to use prints and frames for too. Many studios now display these photos without directly on boards without glass. Depending on the purpose and the theme of the stills, the scale of the prints may vary significantly.
One can't simply ignore the beauty of such photography. In very artistic displays, photographs can be staged and lit so a new dimension is added to the photographer's vision. With the introduction of full spectrum photography for electronic cameras, improvement in aesthetic refinery has been achieved. So much can be accomplished with an easy filtering of visible, infrared and ultraviolet light.

Many options are available now in terms of photo-shooting models and printing capabilities. It's quite amazing that a lot of fine art photography items sell in auction rooms every year (not to mention for very high prices too!). While many still don't go for this type of photography, the collector's market is very active here. A lot of cultural events and shows include this type of photography.
Also, this type of photography may stand in opposition with commercial or home photography business and photojournalism, but somehow it owes them a lot. At times, the separation lines between the various models can be identified barely. We see this taking place each day with some of the photos and stills we admire in magazines as they are designed to be both artistic and commercial.


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